Author Guidlines

Style Guide for Submitting Papers

Abstract

The work aims to tell you the submission format for The New English Teacher Journal. The New English Teacher presents information and ideas on theories, research, methods and materials related to language learning and teaching. Within this framework the Journal welcomes contributions in such areas of current enquiry as first and second language learning and teaching, language and culture, discourse analysis, language planning, language testing, multilingual education, stylistics, translation and information technology.

Keyword: Assumption University, GSE, NET, Style Guide, Submission Format

 

Introduction

The New English Teacher has a broad purview in that it wants to act as a forum to present information and ideas on theories, research, methods and materials related to language learning and teaching.

Within this framework, the journal welcomes contributions in such areas of inquiry as language learning and teaching, language and culture, discourse analysis, language teaching, multilingualism and multimedia.

The New English Teacher has as its central concern the application of language to education and with contributions that have in mind the common professional concerns of both the classroom teacher and the researcher.

 

Headings

Headings should be in bold type, in 14 point Times New Roman. First-level headings should be aligned to the left with initial caps, as illustrated above. One line space should separate headings from the preceding text.

 

Subheadings

Italicize the subheadings in the bold type, single-spaced, and the subheading should be indented from the margin. Subheadings should be in 12 point Times New Roman.


Abstract and Body

Abstract and Keywords

Each manuscript should be accompanied by a title, the author(s) name and affiliation together with an email address on a separate sheet of paper. An informative abstract (200 words), containing a summary of the conceptual content of the article, and about four to six keywords arranged in alphabetical order should appear together with the main body of the article.

 

Main Text, Tables and Figures

All body paragraphs should be indented from the margin and right justified, single-space the body of the paper, and use 12 point Times New Roman throughout. Figures and tables should be placed as close as possible to where they are cited. All tables and figures should be embedded into the file and sized appropriately. Photographs must be properly sized and positioned in the body of the paper.

 

Citation

All sources cited in the manuscripts must follow the APA guidelines (Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition), and must be alphabetically ordered.

 

A Work by Two Authors: Name both authors in the signal phrase or in the parentheses each time you cite the work. Use the word "and" between the authors' names within the text and use the ampersand in the parentheses.

 

Research by Wegener and Petty (1994) supports...

(Wegener & Petty, 1994)

 

A Work by Three to Five Authors: List all the authors in the signal phrase or in parentheses the first time you cite the source. Use the word "and" between the authors' names within the text and use the ampersand in the parentheses.

 

(Kernis, Cornell, Sun, Berry, & Harlow, 1993)

 

In subsequent citations, only use the first author's last name followed by "et al." in the signal phrase or in parentheses.

 

(Kernis et al., 1993)

 

Six or More Authors: Use the first author's name followed by et al. in the signal phrase or in parentheses.

 

Harris et al. (2001) argued...

(Harris et al., 2001)

 

Two or More Works by the Same Author in the Same Year: If you have two sources by the same author in the same year, use lower-case letters (a, b, c) with the year to order the entries in the reference list. Use the lower-case letters with the year in the in-text citation.

 

Research by Berndt (1981a) illustrated that...

 

References

Brown, D. H. (1994). Principles of language learning and teaching (3rd ed.). Englewood Cliff, NJ: Prentice-Hall Regents.

Carrel, P. E., & Monroe, L. B. (1993). Learning styles and composition. Modern Language Journal, 77(2), 148-162.

De Huff, E. W. (n.d.). Taytay’s tales: Traditional Pueblo Indian tales. Retrieved from  http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/dehuff/taytay/taytay.html

Willis, D. (1996). Accuracy, fluency and conformity. In J. Willis & D. Willis (Eds.), Challenge and change in language teaching (pp. 44-51). Oxford: Macmillan, Heinemann.

 

Appendix

The appendix should immediately follow the references.