AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN JOB DEMAND-CONTROL-SUPPORT MODEL, SELF-EFFICACY, BURNOUT, INFORMAL LEARNING, AND JOB PERFORMANCE: A CASE OF EMPLOYEES IN THE THAI BANKING SECTOR

Panita Siriphat, Nisada Wedchayanon

Abstract


Job Demand-Control-Support model addresses occupational stress and the model was developed by Johnson and Hall (1988). The model predicts that work designs and the health and productivity of workers are related. Occupational stress is stress related to one’s job which do not fit for one’s knowledge, skills, or expectations, and cause difficulty for solving. It can increase when one receives little support from supervisors or colleagues. The purpose of this study is to fulfil the gap from previous research by choosing self-efficacy as personal resource, and informal learning to be incorporated to this model. Data was collected from five hundred and thirty-nine (539) sample of respondents from three public commercial banks in Thailand. Level of analysis is at individual level to focus on the perceptions and personality of individuals. Data was analyzed using SEM to test measurement model and structural model. The findings revealed that psychological strain or burnout is occurred when psychological job demands are high; the employee’s decision authority is high, and socially isolating. Informal learning could be found in demanding situations, high skill discretion and decision authority, and through social interaction with supervisors and coworkers. In addition, the result showed that high level of self-efficacy reduced psychological demand, and later reduced burnout. Self-efficacy also directly and indirectly affected informal learning through job demands, job control, and social support provided by organization.

Keywords


Job Demand-Control-Support model; workplace learning; burnout; informal learning.

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